Few things on the Internet giveth and taketh away the way a read receipt does. An immediate read-and-response is immense validation, while a crucial message that has been read but not responded to is emotionally crushing—you can never pretend hard enough like you have better things to do than wait for a reply.

Read receipts are transitioning from a quirky, semi-invasive e-mail option to an always-on feature in messaging services like Facebook, but they aren’t always welcome. In many instances, they create a mild, uncomfortable social pressure—just enough to keep you talking a little longer than you might want.

Why I hate read receipts by Casey Johnston
parislemon

Holy “Finally” Hell. That took long enough. Now can we get an update to iOS that doesn’t ruin the battery?

parislemon:

Matthew Panzarino:

Apple has released OS X 10.8.4 for Mac computers today, and it fixes a host of things, including an annoying iMessage bug which caused entries to come in out of order in the Messages app.

The “finally” joke actually applies here. Finally.

thisistheverge
thisistheverge:

Google Glass’ awkward interactions parodied on ‘Saturday Night Live’
Google Glass and its new approach to a constantly-connected lifestyle has already been the butt of a number of jokes, including Tumblr blogs devoted to showing how ridiculous the device can be. On Saturday’s new episode of Saturday Night Live, the writers of Weekend Update also got into the fray, with fictional tech blogger Randall Meeks and his new Google Glass joining the news desk to speak to Seth Meyers. 

I couldn’t have been happier with an SNL segment about technology. What in the what is going on?

thisistheverge:

Google Glass’ awkward interactions parodied on ‘Saturday Night Live’

Google Glass and its new approach to a constantly-connected lifestyle has already been the butt of a number of jokes, including Tumblr blogs devoted to showing how ridiculous the device can be. On Saturday’s new episode of Saturday Night Live, the writers of Weekend Update also got into the fray, with fictional tech blogger Randall Meeks and his new Google Glass joining the news desk to speak to Seth Meyers. 

I couldn’t have been happier with an SNL segment about technology. What in the what is going on?

More on Clicky Keyboards, a response to Pablog’s comment
For full context, the Das Keyboard isn’t the only keyboard I’m looking at. The two other models are the Tactile Pro 3 and the Quiet Pro [1] by Matias. So far, though, the Das is the only model I can find to play around with at NYC stores. I may have been given a good lead on a location that may have a great selection of third party apple products, so this may be updated later.
The Das Keyboad and the Tactile Pro series are known for - amongst other things - not fading into the background of your writing environment. They are not thin, they are not quiet, and they are not light. And yes, as Pablo noted, they are built to click. To click loudly, even. They are so known for the noises made that popular mac blogger Shawn Blanc’s review of a few different models is simple titled Clicky Keyboards.

For me, the noise level isn’t what’s drawing me to these keyboards. It’s that I don’t like the feels of the clicks on my current keyboards. The keys on the keyboards I’ve mentioned above are jumping up and down via mechanical switches, and not the plastic scissor switches with plastic membranes that the chiclet keys on all Apple keyboards today use.
These key switches provide a drastically different experience, giving feedback to the typist and supposedly leading to a better typing experience. What I experienced typing (rap lyrics and short reviews of podcasts) yesterday at TekServe, was - physically - the closest thing the modern computer user can get to using a typewriter. If you look at the above image, the blue/brown switches of the keys push down and the springs help provide the feedback.
Of course, though, the clicky nature of the keyboards is something that has to be helping and hurting the experience of writing. Helping, because of the auditory confirmation of keys being correctly clicked, and hurting because it’s driving you to be an even bigger hermit than you were before already, since these things can’t be easy to be around. Well, I guess that’s only a problem if your writing is taking place in an office or during your off hours when those who live with you are around.
But some swear by the loud keyboard lifestyle. Whatever works, though, is the old phrase about writing. If you’ve found a working solution (and I quickly banged this out on my laptop’s keyboard, so who knows what I really need) you might not need to jump onto the good ship Mechanical Switches. But if you’re like Pablo, and you write for a living, there is an allure in getting into the clicky keyboard game. It just can seem like a cult depending on how far away you’re examining it. 
For further information:
Shawn Blanc’s Clicky Keyboards is a good entry point to the conversation, and for further down the rabbit hole, Overclock.net’s forum section on mechanical keyboards is almost too informative and detailed.
[1] The Quiet Pro, though, is a recent release from Matias and delivers a less clicky experience, but all reports are saying the keys are noticeably lesser in terms of the clicking experience for feedback, etc.. If I get a keyboard, it will likely be one of the two loud models, if only because I do care about the feel of the keys.

More on Clicky Keyboards, a response to Pablog’s comment

For full context, the Das Keyboard isn’t the only keyboard I’m looking at. The two other models are the Tactile Pro 3 and the Quiet Pro [1] by Matias. So far, though, the Das is the only model I can find to play around with at NYC stores. I may have been given a good lead on a location that may have a great selection of third party apple products, so this may be updated later.

The Das Keyboad and the Tactile Pro series are known for - amongst other things - not fading into the background of your writing environment. They are not thin, they are not quiet, and they are not light. And yes, as Pablo noted, they are built to click. To click loudly, even. They are so known for the noises made that popular mac blogger Shawn Blanc’s review of a few different models is simple titled Clicky Keyboards.

image

For me, the noise level isn’t what’s drawing me to these keyboards. It’s that I don’t like the feels of the clicks on my current keyboards. The keys on the keyboards I’ve mentioned above are jumping up and down via mechanical switches, and not the plastic scissor switches with plastic membranes that the chiclet keys on all Apple keyboards today use.

These key switches provide a drastically different experience, giving feedback to the typist and supposedly leading to a better typing experience. What I experienced typing (rap lyrics and short reviews of podcasts) yesterday at TekServe, was - physically - the closest thing the modern computer user can get to using a typewriter. If you look at the above image, the blue/brown switches of the keys push down and the springs help provide the feedback.

Of course, though, the clicky nature of the keyboards is something that has to be helping and hurting the experience of writing. Helping, because of the auditory confirmation of keys being correctly clicked, and hurting because it’s driving you to be an even bigger hermit than you were before already, since these things can’t be easy to be around. Well, I guess that’s only a problem if your writing is taking place in an office or during your off hours when those who live with you are around.

But some swear by the loud keyboard lifestyle. Whatever works, though, is the old phrase about writing. If you’ve found a working solution (and I quickly banged this out on my laptop’s keyboard, so who knows what I really need) you might not need to jump onto the good ship Mechanical Switches. But if you’re like Pablo, and you write for a living, there is an allure in getting into the clicky keyboard game. It just can seem like a cult depending on how far away you’re examining it. 

For further information:

Shawn Blanc’s Clicky Keyboards is a good entry point to the conversation, and for further down the rabbit hole, Overclock.net’s forum section on mechanical keyboards is almost too informative and detailed.

[1] The Quiet Pro, though, is a recent release from Matias and delivers a less clicky experience, but all reports are saying the keys are noticeably lesser in terms of the clicking experience for feedback, etc.. If I get a keyboard, it will likely be one of the two loud models, if only because I do care about the feel of the keys.

A review of iTunes 11 in a series of posts, Part 1. 
Albums is the new default viewing mode for iTunes 11, and clicking on an album cover in this mode, unveils one of Apple’s latest pieces of eye candy mojo.
Each track listing for an album which has art is type-set with colors pulled from the album art.
For me this feels like something that I never would have thought of, and still don’t think I need. Luckily, it only effects the area of the track listing. Skinning iTunes based on the album I’m listening to smacks of the old days of Winamp (stop me when I’m dating myself).
Another issue with this is that the font iTunes uses is often far too frail. For these areas, they needed to be using a thicker font face, or maybe even just the bold font face of what’s here.

Something I’ve learned over the years working in printed products is that the thinner a font face is, the riskier using it on a poorly contrasted background, or white text on said background, is.
Having iTunes’ special-sauce-coding auto generate these colors really makes the issues with the font-size and readability glare on occasion.
Luckily for me, I’m mostly using iTunes in what I’d call the iTunes 10 view. How that view can be set up? Click Songs view, and then these are your preferred settings. That’s your little reward for finishing this post.
Coming up next? The most infuriating error message since the Blue Screen of Death.

A review of iTunes 11 in a series of posts, Part 1. 

Albums is the new default viewing mode for iTunes 11, and clicking on an album cover in this mode, unveils one of Apple’s latest pieces of eye candy mojo.

Each track listing for an album which has art is type-set with colors pulled from the album art.

For me this feels like something that I never would have thought of, and still don’t think I need. Luckily, it only effects the area of the track listing. Skinning iTunes based on the album I’m listening to smacks of the old days of Winamp (stop me when I’m dating myself).

Another issue with this is that the font iTunes uses is often far too frail. For these areas, they needed to be using a thicker font face, or maybe even just the bold font face of what’s here.

image

Something I’ve learned over the years working in printed products is that the thinner a font face is, the riskier using it on a poorly contrasted background, or white text on said background, is.

Having iTunes’ special-sauce-coding auto generate these colors really makes the issues with the font-size and readability glare on occasion.

Luckily for me, I’m mostly using iTunes in what I’d call the iTunes 10 view. How that view can be set up? Click Songs view, and then these are your preferred settings. That’s your little reward for finishing this post.

Coming up next? The most infuriating error message since the Blue Screen of Death.